The Dangers of Fosamax

by admin on January 20, 2011

The Dangers of Fosamax

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Home Page > Law > Health and Safety > The Dangers of Fosamax

The Dangers of Fosamax

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Posted: Jan 19, 2011 |Comments: 0
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According to drugs.com, Fosamax (alendronate) is in the group of medicines called bisphosphonates (bis FOS fo nayts). It alters the cycle of bone formation and breakdown in the body. Fosamax slows bone loss while increasing bone mass, which may prevent bone fractures.

Fosamax is used in men and women to treat or prevent osteoporosis that is caused by menopause or by taking steroids. Fosamax is also used to increase bone mass in men who have osteoporosis, and to treat Paget’s disease of bone in men and women.Fosamax may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.Important information about FosamaxDo not take a Fosamax tablet if you cannot sit upright or stand for at least 30 minutes. Fosamax can cause serious problems in the stomach or esophagus (the tube that connects your mouth and stomach). You will need to stay upright for at least 30 minutes after taking Fosamax.Take the Fosamax tablet first thing in the morning, at least 30 minutes before you eat or drink anything or take any other medicine.Take each dose with a full glass (6 to 8 ounces) of water. Use only plain water (not mineral water, coffee, tea, or juice) when taking a Fosamax tablet.For at least the first 30 minutes after taking a Fosamax tablet, do not lie down or recline; do not eat or drink anything other than plain water; and do not take any other medicines including vitamins, calcium, or antacids.Some people using medicines similar to Fosamax have developed bone loss in the jaw, also called osteonecrosis of the jaw. Symptoms may include jaw pain, swelling, numbness, loose teeth, gum infection, or slow healing after injury or surgery involving the gums. You may be more likely to develop osteonecrosis of the jaw if you have cancer or have been treated with chemotherapy, radiation, or steroids. Other conditions associated with osteonecrosis of the jaw include blood clotting disorders, anemia (low red blood cells), and a pre-existing dental problem.If you need to have any dental work (especially surgery), tell the dentist ahead of time that you are using Fosamax. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.Fosamax is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet changes, exercise, and taking calcium and vitamin supplements. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.Do not take a Fosamax tablet if you cannot sit upright or stand for at least 30 minutes. Fosamax can cause serious problems in the stomach or esophagus (the tube that connects your mouth and stomach). You will need to stay upright for at least 30 minutes after taking this medication.You should not take Fosamax if you are allergic to alendronate, or if you have low levels of calcium in your blood (hypocalcemia), or a problem with the movement of muscles in your esophagus.
To make sure you can safely take Fosamax, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

trouble swallowing;
a vitamin D deficiency;
a dental problem;
kidney disease; or
an ulcer or other problem in your stomach or esophagus.

Some people using medicines similar to Fosamax have developed bone loss in the jaw, also called osteonecrosis of the jaw. Symptoms may include jaw pain, swelling, numbness, loose teeth, gum infection, or slow healing after injury or surgery involving the gums.You may be more likely to develop osteonecrosis of the jaw if you have cancer or have been treated with chemotherapy, radiation, or steroids. Other conditions associated with osteonecrosis of the jaw include blood clotting disorders, anemia (low red blood cells), and dental surgery or pre-existing dental problems.FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Fosamax will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether alendronate passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use Fosamax without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Fosamax may cause a femur bone fracture, according to the FDA. Our lawyers are currently meeting with people who say the osteoporosis drug Fosamax caused this injury.
Fosamax is a prescription medicine for the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis (thinning of bone) in women after menopause. Fosamax is designed to reduce the chance of having a hip or spinal fracture (break), and is also used as a treatment to increase bone mass in people with osteoporosis. Like most drugs, it carries the risk for certain side effects.Fosamax, manufactured by Merck & Co., is in a class of drugs called bisphosphonates. The FDA is currently reviewing reports to see if there is an increased risk of atypical subtrochanteric femur fractures—fractures in the bone just below the hip joint—in some patients who’ve been on these drugs for several years.Read the 3.10.10 health notice from FDAFosamax side effects, femur fracture, lawsuit informationOur firm is currently meeting with people who took Fosamax and sustained a femur fracture. This injury is specifically being referred to as “low-energy,”–that is, the fracture typically occurs in a fall from a “standing height or less,” such as stepping down stairs. This injury is very unusual because the femur is one of the strongest bones in the body.

For further information Contact Andrew Calcagno, Esq. at andrew@nynjlaw.net

www.nynjlaw.net

www.nynjlaw.net/fosamax.htm

 


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CALCAGNO & ASSOCIATES has been representing the seriously injured and disabled in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania for 20 years. CALCAGNO & ASSOCIATES has an excellent reputation among its clients, the judiciary and the legal community. We Fight For Your Rights!
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